BulgingButtons

Not bad for a fat girl


Leave a comment

Writing Marathon

download.jpg

Yesterday we took our kid writers on a writing marathon, and it was so cool! Well, not literally. It was actually very hot, so we started early, sought shade, and ducked inside to air conditioned spaces a few times. Still, it was a great experience, and the kids came up with some interesting writing.

Our group toured the college campus where we meet, finding interesting spots to write. We looked around, found a spot, and got to work. The locations were used as inspiration, but didn’t dictate the writing. Our campus is pretty much a desert oasis, with scrubby brush, cactus, rocks, Palo Verde and Mesquite trees, and desert flowers. There are also grassy areas, and plenty of small animals. We spied white winged doves, quail, bees, ants, flies, sparrows, moths, butterflies, a hummingbird, and a jackrabbit. They’re always there, but sometimes we forget to look for them.

We found a hidden courtyard outside the library, and in the library a very cool collection of anatomy models. Heads, hearts, lungs, eyeballs, and more were available for us to explore. In summer the library isn’t very busy, and the librarians were happy to see us (and provide a band-aid for a skinned knee).

I’ve had the extreme pleasure of participating in a “real” writing marathon in New Orleans; one that took me around that remarkable city over the course of a few days. I learned that people are generous to writers. They give us space and time and sometimes wine and coffee. They are curious about our process and product. Rarely do we see writers up close, even though to a greater or lesser extent we’re all writers.

Taking these young writers on their first (or in some cases second) marathon was a way for me to share my love of writing and my fascination with our world with these young people. I hope they enjoyed it as much as I did.

images.jpg

These writers are from a previous marathon.


2 Comments

Ten Days of Terrific Writing

images.jpgTomorrow writing camp begins again. Usually I have a few days off between school ending and camp starting, but not this time. I feel like it’s kind of rushed, but then again, it sure feels like summer, so let’s go for it!

I’m fortunate to work with another wonderful teacher, so these ten days aren’t entirely my own. It’s nice to share the responsibilities, and to have double the ideas and energy to bring to the camp, especially this time, since there are currently 18 kids signed up for our session.

Our particular group ranges in age from those entering third grade to those entering eighth. Now that’s a range! We’ve got some fun and creative ideas up our sleeves, so all of our young writers will leave with some intriguing new stories.

Now to get it all put together on the computer, and, hopefully, to get the technology working correctly in the classroom tomorrow morning. And if not? We’ll do it the old fashioned way! Happy summer writing to you!

 


Leave a comment

Another Year in the Books

schools-out1.jpg

The 2017-2018 school year has (finally) come to a close, and what a year it was.

The final week of school seemed to stretch on and on as a result of the six days lost during our unforeseen walk-out. The final day for kids was originally May 24, and for many families, that’s when school ended. Vacation plans were already set, or parents were just ready for their kids to be done, so they were.

Others held on, past Memorial Day, into this week. It was a slow dwindling. My class of 28 became 26, then 19, then, by yesterday, only 13. Our day was pared down, too, only three hours. Those kids helped me move out of our old classroom and into my new one, down the hall. They hauled books and boxes and totes and posters. They organized bins and texts and art supplies. They made a huge job so much easier.

They also played. The kids brought board games form home, and I had several decks of cards, and they played with one another in a way that isn’t usually possible during the school year. They were patient with one another, and they were encouraging, but they were also competitive. They had had a great time. Even on the last day of school, they had things to reveal to me that I hadn’t seen before.

I will miss these students, as I miss all the kids who have come through my room. Each year the group has its own dynamics, and each group leaves its mark on my heart. This year is no different. I’m honored to have been their teacher.